Math 1131 - Fall 2017
Calculus I
Section 160

Instructor Keith Conrad (If this is not your instructor, this is not a page for your section of Math 1131.)
Email math1131course at gmail dot com. (Use this address to write to Prof. Conrad about the course. When you send an email message, please include your name at the end of the message and include your discussion section number and NetID.)
Office hours Wednesday 10-11 and 3:30-4:30 in MONT 234, or by appointment.
Class info
Common Course Page: Click here.
Lectures: 2:00-3:15PM T/Th in Schenker 151.
Worksheet/quiz calendar: this page lists due dates for worksheets and dates for quizzes and exams.
Discussion Sections: The TAs have discussion sections, email addresses, and office hours as listed below.
                 161D
  9:05-9:55AM MW in OAK 269
Zoe Cramer (zoe.cramer at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: M 10-11, 2:30-3:30 and T 9:30-10:30 in MONT 105
                 162D
  1:25-2:15PM MW in MONT 419
Zoe Cramer (zoe.cramer at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: M 10-11, 2:30-3:30 and T 9:30-10:30 in MONT 105
                 163D
  3:35-4:25PM MW in MONT 321
Zoe Cramer (zoe.cramer at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: M 10-11, 2:30-3:30 and T 9:30-10:30 in MONT 105
                 164D
  3:35-4:25PM MW in MONT 225
Sangjoon Lee (sangjoon.lee at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: MW 1-3 in MONT 422
                 165D
  4:40-5:30PM MW in MONT 321
Sangjoon Lee (sangjoon.lee at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: MW 1-3 in MONT 422
                 166D
  2:30-3:20PM MW in MONT 113
Ebenezer Addo (ebenezer.addo at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: M 11-12, W 10-12 in MONT 213
                 167D
  8:00-8:50AM MW in MONT 111
Anastasiia Minenkova (anastasiia.minenkova at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: M 10-11, W 10-11 and 12-1 in MONT 105
                 168D
  1:25-2:15PM MW in MONT 421
Ebenezer Addo (ebenezer.addo at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: M 11-12, W 10-12 in MONT 213
                 169D
  8:00-8:50AM MW in MONT 319
Ebenezer Addo (ebenezer.addo at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: M 11-12, W 10-12 in MONT 213
                 170D
  9:05-9:55AM MW in GENT 203
Anastasiia Minenkova (anastasiia.minenkova at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: M 10-11, W 10-11 and 12-1 in MONT 105
                 171D
  1:25-2:15PM MW in LH 108
Anastasiia Minenkova (anastasiia.minenkova at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: M 10-11, W 10-11 and 12-1 in MONT 105
                 172D
  8:00AM-8:50AM MW in MONT 420
Sangjoon Lee (sangjoon.lee at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: MW 1-3 in MONT 422
                 173D
  11:15AM-12:05PM MW in MONT 420
Anthony Hershberger (anthony.hershberger at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: T/Th 10-11:30 in MONT 213
                 174D
  12:20-1:10PM MW in MONT 113
Anthony Hershberger (anthony.hershberger at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: T/Th 10-11:30 in MONT 213
                 175D
  4:40-5:30PM MW in LH 109
Anthony Hershberger (anthony.hershberger at uconn dot edu)
Office hours: T/Th 10-11:30 in MONT 213


Brief course description: This course focuses on techniques and applications of differential calculus and an introduction to integral calculus. Concepts will be treated from a geometric, algebraic, and numerical perspective.

Topics Covered: Sections to be covered from the text are in Chapters 1 through 6. A course outline in a weekly chart is here. Since lectures are twice a week, usually half the weekly material will be covered in each lecture. You are strongly urged to read the book before the corresponding lecture in the class and to use office hours of the instructor and TAs, as well as the Q Center to get help. The pace of this course is not slow. If you blow off class for a week, you may find yourself completely lost and it can be hard to catch up. Make sure to get any misunderstandings about the material cleared up right away!

Prerequisites: Precalculus. The hardest issue students usually have in calculus is not the new topics in calculus, but rather the constant use of precalculus. If you find your familiarity with precalculus to be inadequate, make sure to seriously review the material. Use the Q Center as well as resources (videos, flashcards, clicker questions) for Math 1131 and Math 1060 here (requires NetID and password to access).

Textbook: See the common course page.

Lecture notes: These will be available at the page for the large lecture (section 160) in HuskyCT.

Homework: Your homework problems will be done using WebAssign, which you will access from your discussion section page for Math 1131 on HuskyCT.

Worksheets: Worksheets are available from the Learning Activities tab of the common course page. They are submitted to your TA in discussion sections, and your TA will indicate the due dates for worksheets in their discussion section.

Clickers: During most lectures there will be some questions that you answer using clickers. Information about registering your clicker is on the common course page.

Quizzes: Each week, except during midterm weeks, there will be a quiz at the start of the second discussion section.

Exams: There are three midterms, all in discussion section, on Sept. 20, Oct. 18, and Nov. 15. If you need exam accommodations based on a documented disability, you need to speak with both the Center for Student Disabilities and the course instructor within the first two weeks of the semester.

Course grade:  On the common course page is a breakdown of how much different parts of the course contribute to the course grade (including clickers, quizzes, and exams).

Makeup policy:  Late work will not be accepted.

Course conduct: To respect everyone's right to a productive learning environment, you do not want to distract yourself or your classmates. Please refrain from disruptive activities during lecture and discussion section. On a positive note, do feel free to ask questions!

Learning Tips:


Calculators: On the exams you may use calculators below a TI-89, but not TI-89 or something higher. Do not let the calculator become a mental crutch as you try to understand the ideas of this course, most of which actually have nothing to do with calculators. You should regard the use of a calculator somewhat like that of a dictionary or grammar table for another language. Someone who needs a dictionary to translate even the simplest part of a basic French text or to hold a conversation in French does not know French that well. Of course properly using and understanding the French language means a lot more than just knowing French words and how they are inflected, but such knowledge without outside aids is an important prerequisite to becoming comfortable with French. In the same way, your comfort in this course will increase if you can handle certain basic computations quickly in your head. These include:

Academic integrity: Students are expected to avoid academic misconduct. Your integrity is not worth losing (and the course not worth failing) by falsely presenting yourself in any aspect of this course. For further information on academic integrity, see Appendix A of the Student Code.


Some links

The Q Center: main page, schedule by course and by topic, and other tutoring.

Video sites: Patrick JMT, Khan Academy, UConn math department resources for precalculus.

Computational sites for checking work: Desmos (for graphing), Mathway, Wolfram Alpha


Handouts


Tips for using WebAssign.

Correct and incorrect algebra formulas.

Properties of logarithms.

If you've wondered where the names of trig functions come from (why is the ratio of sine to cosine called tangent?) look here.

Differentiation rules explained.

Trigonometric derivatives explained.

Linearization and differentials.

Graphs of functions and derivatives.


Recent Announcements

5/7: Course page created

8/28: Course starts.



Credit: I respectfully stole the code for much of this page from its original designer, Glenn Tesler. Thanks, Glenn!