Mathematical Poetry at Bridges 2017


A reading in the afternoon
 
  Sunday, July 30, time: 2:00 - 4:00 pm
  Davis Centre, Room 1304

University of  Waterloo
 

The  Program

                                                                                                   
Coordinated by Sarah Glaz, professor of mathematics at the University of Connecticut and poet, the poetry reading at Bridges 2017 features poetry with strong links to mathematics, a great variety of topics, and a wide range of poetic styles. The first part of the program starts with special guest poet, Marco Lucchesi, reading a selection from his mathematical hymns, followed by invited poets: Robin Chapman, Marion Deutsche Cohen, Carol Dorf, Emily Grosholz, JoAnne Growney, Alice Major, Kaz Maslanka, Daniel May, Mike Naylor and Eveline Pye, reading selections from their work. The program concludes with an open microphone period where Bridges participants read their own mathematical poems.  A pdf file of the program is available here. More information about the Bridges poetry readings and anthologies is  available at Bridges 2017 Poetry Reading website.

About the Coordinator and the Invited Poets
                                                           

Sarah Glaz

Sarah Glaz is professor of mathematics at the University of Connecticut specializing in the area of commutative algebra. She also has a lifelong interest in poetry. Sarah translated poetry from several languages, wrote articles on the connections between mathematics and poetry, experimented with poetry in the mathematics classroom, co-edited the poetry anthology Strange Attractors: Poems of Love and Mathematics, is editor of the print and online Bridges Poetry Anthologies 2013, 2014 and 2016, and served as Guest Editor for the Journal of Mathematics and the Arts Special Issue:  Poetry and Mathematics. Sarah's mathematical poetry appeared in: Ibis Review, ConvergenceThe American Math MonthlyThe Ghazal Page, Journal of Humanistic Mathematics, Recursive Angel, Talking Writing, American Scientist, The London Grip, and several anthologies. She is an associate editor for Journal of Mathematics and the Arts.

Website: http://www.math.uconn.edu/~glaz
Sample Poem: Pythagoras plays his lyre


  

Marco Lucchesi
Marco Lucchesi,  professor of comparative literature at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, is a Brazilian poet, novelist, essayist and translator. In 2011, he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Letters, for which he acts as director of publications and editor-in-chief of its journal,  Revista Brasileira. He is also a regular contributor to the newspaper, O Globo, and former editor of the National Library of Brazil poetry magazine, Poesia Sempre. His publications include twelve  award winning books and numerous works of translation,  among others Poemas Reunidos (Collected Poems), Hinos Matematicos (Mathematical Hymns)Irminsul (his collected Italian poems),  and translations of Rumi, Khlebnikov, Rilke,  Pasternak and Vico. His work has been widely anthologized and translated into more than ten languages. His literary honors include the Prize Alceu Amoroso Lima, a lifetime achievement award in poetry. 




Website: https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=pt&u=https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marco_Lucchesi&prev=search
Sample poem: Eros

Robin Chapman


Robin Chapman is a poet, painter and developmental psycholinguist. She is Professor Emerita of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and emerita Principal Investigator at the Waisman Center, where she studied language development in children with Down syndrome. A fellow of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters and co-organizer of the UW Chaos and Complex Systems Seminar, she is author of ten books of poetry, including, the eelgrass meadow, One Hundred White Pelicans (poems of science and climate change), Six True Things (poems of childhood in the Manhattan Project town of Oak Ridge, TN) and, with physicist J.C. Sprott, Images of a Complex World: The Art and Poetry of Chaos (World Scientific, 2005). Her mathematical poems have appeared in the Journal of Humanistic Mathematics, The Mathematical Intelligencer, and the anthology Strange Attractors.


Website: http://robinchapmanspoetryandpainting.blogspot.com/
Sample poem: Math education

Marion Cohen

Marion Deutsche Cohen holds a Ph.D. degree in mathematics from Wesleyan University and teaches at Arcadia University. Her latest poetry collection, Truth and Beauty (WordTech Editions, 2017), is about the interaction among students and teacher in her course, Mathematics in Literature. Author of twenty-seven books of poetry and prose, Marion published in her first volume of poetry, The Weirdest Is the Sphere, a mathematical poem dating back to age seven. Her later mathematical poems were collected in her volume, Crossing the Equal Sign (Plain View Press, 2006). Her oeuvre includes two controversial memoirs about spousal chronic illness.  All of her books have some mathematics in them.  Marion lives with her husband in Philadelphia, where in addition to poetry and mathematics, she enjoys food, thrift shop expeditions, and visits from her grown-up children and grandchildren.



Website: http://www.marioncohen.net/
Sample poem: Not as much as before

Carol Dorf

Carol Dorf is fascinated with the boundaries between disciplines, particularly mathematics and poetry. She is poetry editor of Talking Writing where she writes about issues in contemporary poetry, and has edited two issues on mathematical poetry, as well as an issue on poetry occupying the interstitial space of nature and technology. Carol teaches high school mathematics, and leads poetry reading and writing workshops, as a California-Poet-in-the-Schools, at Berkeley City College and other art venues. Recently she tried to bring her loves together by introducing poetry into the mathematics classroom and by teaching poetry writing to mathematics teachers. Her chapbook, Theory Headed Dragon, published in 2016, is available through Finishing Line Press. Carol's writing appeared in  Vinyl, Glint, Slipstream, Spillway, Sin Fronteras, About Place, The Journal of Humanistic Mathematics, American Scientist, Scientific American, Maintenant, and elsewhere.



Website: http://talkingwriting.com/why-poets-sometimes-think-in-numbers/
Sample poem: Gold standard

Emilt Grosholz

Emily Grosholz is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor at Pennsylvania State University, and has been an advisory editor for the Hudson Review for thirty years. The Stars of Earth: New and Selected Poems will be published in 2017 by Word Galaxy/Able Muse Press, with drawings by Farhad Ostovani. Her latest chapbook, Childhood, published by Accents Publishing with drawings by Lucy Vines Bonnefoy, has raised over $2500 in the past two years for UNICEF. A Japanese translation by Atsuko Hayakawa and an Italian translation by Sara Amadori were recently published, and a French translation by Pascale Drouet is underway. Her philosophy book Starry Reckoning: Reference and Analysis in Mathematics and Cosmology is just out from Springer, which will publish her book on poetry and mathematics, Great Circles: The Transits of Mathematics and Poetry, next year.


Website: http://www.emilygrosholz.com/index.html
Sample poem:
The Continuum: Trying to describe the Reals in Cambridge
 
 

JoAnne Growney 

JoAnne Growney  has retired from teaching mathematics at Bloomsburg University, PA and now lives in Silver Spring, MD where she writes a few poems, guides occasional poetry workshops, blogs (on "Intersections -- Poetry with Mathematics") and enjoys both mathy and poetic conversations with her grandchildren.  During childhood on a farm in Western Pennsylvania, JoAnne began to love poetry when she found Robert Louis Stevenson's A Child's Garden of Verses on her family's bookshelf, but then she left poetry for a time as scholarships in mathematics enabled her to finance some education. Now she delights in the elegance of language in both mathy and poetic domains and hopes to use words effectively not only for enjoyment and insight but also to promote vital causes, including equal opportunities and recognition for women and protection of our environment.


Blog website: http://poetrywithmathematics.blogspot.com
Sample poem: Looking for mathematics in Hedy Lamarr

 
Alice Major

Alice Major will publish her eleventh poetry collection Welcome to the Anthropocene, in 2018 with the University of Alberta Press. Her book of essays, Intersecting Sets: A Poet Looks at Science, has been awarded the Wilfrid Eggleston Award for non-fiction. Among her writing awards are the Pat Lowther Award for poetry. Her interest in mathematics began at the age of twelve, when she was introduced to non-Euclidean geometry in one of Martin Gardner's books.  Ever since, like Percy Bysshe Shelley, she turns to math and science "to replenish my store of metaphor." She has been president of the League of Canadian Poets, first poet laureate for her home city of Edmonton (in western Canada), and is the founder of the Edmonton Poetry Festival. In 2012 Alice was inducted to Edmonton's Arts and Culture Hall of Fame.


Website: http://www.alicemajor.com/
Sample poem: Multi/Verse



 

Kaz Maslanka

Kaz Maslanka received a BFA in sculpture from Wichita State University, where he also studied music, mathematics and physics. He has been pioneering mathematical poetry for over thirty years and was nominated for a pushcart prize in poetry. His polyasthetic work maintains an international presence through exhibitions and museum collections around the world, as well as through his award winning blog, "Mathematical Poetry" (see link below).  Kaz lives in San Diego, California where he works both as an artist and as an engineering group leader designing parametric CAD models for aerospace technology. He is on the board of directors of San Diego's  Sonic Arts Studio and serves on the advisory boards of the Bronowski Art and Science Forum and the project, DNA of Creativity, sponsored by San Diego Visual Arts Network.

Blog website: http://mathematicalpoetry.blogspot.com/
Sample poem: Golden fear

 

Daniel May 

Dan May is an assistant professor of mathematics at Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota. His Ph.D. research focused on Mutually Unbiased Bases, an area which incorporates topics from linear algebra, group theory and finite geometry. His recent research interests include the connections between poetry and discrete mathematics, and the combinatorics of card games such as Set and Spot It. Dan has been spending his last several summers working with Bridge to Enter Advanced Mathematics (BEAM), a summer residential mathematics program for underserved students from New York City public middle schools. He has also received Title II grants to create and teach in-service workshops for South Dakota middle school teachers. Dan moonlights as a musicologist, and has presented several seminar talks on a variety of musical genres at his university.


Website: https://wordsdanwrote.wordpress.com
Sample poem: Ludvig Sylow: a paean

Mike Naylor


Mike Naylor is a co-director of Matematikkbolgen and of the Math Creativity and Competency Center in Norway. He gives courses for teachers, students and the public, designs math rooms for schools and develops mathematical games and learning products. Mike presents mathematical ideas in creative ways, including poetry, literature, art, music, video, software, drama, and other performances, and is author of over one hundred publications spanning a range of mathematical genres. Mike is known for his Naked Geometry art series and book, and his quarterly column on Mathematics and Creativity in Tangenten magazine. In 2015 he was named a "Math and Science Hero" by the minister of education in Norway. For the past eight years Mike presented artwork and poetry at the Bridges conferences. More information on Mike's projects can be found at his website.


Website: 
http://mike-naylor.com
Sample poem:
Water's edge


Eveline Pye


Eveline Pye
worked as an Operational Research Analyst for Nchanga Consolidated Copper Mines, in Zambia, for almost ten years, and was a Statistics Lecturer at Glasgow Caledonian University, in Scotland, for over twenty years. Her mathematical and statistical poetry has been published in a wide range of literary magazines, newspapers and anthologies. In September 2011, Significance Magazine, the joint publication of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association featured her work in education and published a selection of her poems as part of their Life in Statistics series. She was poetry editor for New Voices Press and worked for the Federation of Writers (Scotland). A collection of her poems about Zambia, Smoke that Thunders, was published by Mariscat Press in 2015. Examples of Eveline's mathematical poems may be found online at various sites, including the link below.






Website: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhanced/doi/10.1111/j.1740-9713.2011.00510.x
Sample poem: Black swan


Open Microphone and Late Additions
Carolyn Lamb
  Carolyn Lamb
  University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
  https://www.facebook.com/draa.teravet
  Reading her poem "The Poisson Distribution"


J.C. Saunders
 J.C. Saunders
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON,  Canada
https://uwaterloo.ca/pure-mathematics/about/people/jc-saunders 
Reading his poem "A Rare Joy"


Carlos Puente
Carlos Puente
University of California, Davis,  CA, USA
http://puente.lawr.ucdavis.edu/index.htm
Reading his poem "Le Plus Improbable" (Deterministic, a gift!)



Osmo Pekonen
Osmo Pekonen
University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla, Finland
http://www.ad.jyu.fi/users/p/pekonen/
Reading his translation from the Finnish of Eeva-Liisa Manner's poem "Descartes"


Kate Jones

Kate Jones
Kadon Enterprises, Inc., Pasadena, MD, USA
http://www.gamepuzzles.com/kjbio.htm
Reading her poem "Stomachion, the Quest" 




Andrea Lumbreras
Andrea Lumbreras
National Center of the Arts (CENART), Mexico City, Mexico
Reading her poem "Between 0 and 1" (translated from the Spanish by Dubravka Suznjevic)



Rashmi_Sunder-Raj
Rashmi Sunder-Raj
Waterloo, ON, Canada
Reading her poem "I resolve"



Lisa Lajeunesse

Lisa Lajeunesse
Capilano University, North Vancouver, BC, Canada
http://66.51.172.120/llajeune/
Reading her poem "An Equation for Love"



Doug Norton
Doug Norton
Villanova University, Villanova, PA, USA
http://www18.homepage.villanova.edu/douglas.norton/
Reading his poem "Bridges Ghazal"




Bob_Rollings
Bob Rollings
Toronto, ON, Canada
http://gallery.bridgesmathart.org/exhibitions/2013-bridges-conference/bob-rollings
Reading the poem "Evolution" by Langdon Smith


Stefan
              Rose
Stefan A. Rose

Waterloo, ON, Canada
http://www.stefanrose.ca/index.html
Reading his poem "On the Operations of the Geometric Military Compass"
 

 

Attention Bridges participants!

Bridges participants are invited to read their mathematical poems in this second part of the reading. If you are interested, please contact Sarah Glaz in person at the meeting or by email at: Sarah.Glaz@uconn.edu.

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