William Abikoff 

Department of Mathematics
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT 06269-3009
Office: MSB 210
Telephone: (860) 486-2003
Fax: (860) 486-4238
email:abikoff@math.uconn.edu



B.S. 1965 Electrical Engineering, the Unified Honors Program, Polytechnic Institute (now of New York University)
M.S. 1966 Electrical Engineering, Polytechnic Institute
Ph.D. 1971 Mathematics, Polytechnic Institute


Research Interests

Riemann surfaces, Teichmueller theory and Kleinian groups, visual realization of geometric structures and applications.



For a short version of my Lifestory just click.

You can also find my Curriculum Vita  here.

My Publication List  graces the this page.



Office hours: 

In Spring, 2014 I'm teaching two sections of  Math 2142 (Advanced Calculus II). If you're interested, click on the course number and you will be transported to the homepage for that course.

The Advanced Calculus Sequence (Math 2141,2142,2413,2144) is, by now, a standard offering of the math department. A detailed description can be found in many places: as a starting point, you could try our undergraduate course offerings or the course homepages; further information is available using the links found in those places.

Early in my career, I was an engineer. As students, a couple of us developed a control system to assist people with disabilities. It got lots of publicity. If you'd like to see what engineering was like in the age of Neanderthals, click here. At that time, older people were astounded that young people could do anything valuable; we were featured in the press, magazines and even the Voice of America.

Now young people don't have to carve out their place in research or creative activity --- it is a natural part of the university experience. I think that's great.

Here are some pictures of the Barycentric (Douady-Earle) extension of some mappings of the circle. Recently Cliff Earle (Cornell), Xingwang Xu (Singapore and Nanjing) and I have extended the methods used to produce the images to rank one non-compact symmetric spaces.

Ultimately, I'm a geometric function theorist. I study the interaction between a space (that's the geometry) and its phenomenology (that's its functions or what can happen in that space).