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Math 1120Q - Fall 2008


Welcome to the MATH 1120Q web page.

Please take a few minutes to click on each of the links in the sidebar. They will provide you with important and useful information about this course.

Calculus is one of the most remarkable and useful achievements of the human mind. Our goal is to help you gain an appreciation for the utility and beauty of this amazing subject.

Good luck and enjoy the class!

 


The calculus is the greatest aid we have to the application of physical truth in the broadest sense of the word
--W. F. Osgood

 

Introduction

Calculus stands as one of the greatest achievements of the human intellect. It is used to model and solve problems in mathematics, the physical sciences, engineering, and the social and biological sciences--that is, problems in our real world.   The main ideas of Calculus are concerned with change and motion and its two fundamental mathematical operations are differentiation and integration. In this course we will study some of the fundamental building blocks of the Calculus--that is, functions, limits, the derivative and applications of differentiation.

As we begin our journey down the Calculus road it is important to keep in mind the following:

  • We expect you to attend all classes (Lecture and Discussion classes) and be on time. You are responsible for all the work discussed in each class so it is important that you attend and participate in class.
  • We expect you to be prepared for each class--that is, to review your class notes and read the assigned material from the text prior to coming to class.
  • We expect you to complete all homework assignments on time through the on-line homework feature called Enhanced WebAssign.
  • We expect you to participate in class--that is, to ask and answer questions in both Lecture and Discussion classes. In order to learn and understand the material it is important that you are actively involved and engaged in the learning process--that is, in doing and discussing mathematics during class.
  • We expect you to seek out help if you don't understand the material taught in class. See your instructor or TA during office hours or visit the Q-Center in the CUE Building or the Calculus Center for extra help.

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Course Description

MATH 1120Q. Introductory Calculus 1. (4 credits). The topics studied in this course will include functions, limits, derivatives, and extreme values of algebraic functions, with supporting algebraic topics.


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Text
  • Calculus, Early Transcendentals, Volume 1, (6th Edition), with WebAssign code. 
    Author: James Stewart  

    You can buy the text for M1120Q, Calculus, Early Transcendentals, Volume 1, by Stewart, at the UConn Co-Op, online directly from the publisher (with a discount), and many other places. The publisher has set up a web page for you to purchase a text online with the WebAssign codes bundled. For information on purchasing the text online go to
    http://ichapterssites.com/ichapters/micro/?cluster_id=1756


  • A webassign access code is required to use the online homework system.

NOTE: If you are planning to take both MATH 1120 and MATH 1121, purchase the bundle with two access codes and the textbook. One access code will be used in MATH 1120 and the second access code will be used when you take MATH 1121.


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Course Outline
Week Sections Topics
1  
§1.1
§1.2
Introduction
Four Ways to Represent a Function
Mathematical Models: A Catalog of Essential Functions
2 §1.3
§1.4
§1.5
New Functions from Old Functions
Graphing Calculators and Computers
Exponential Functions
3 §1.6
§2.1
Inverse Functions and Logarithms
The Tangent and Velocity Problems
4 §2.2
§2.3
The Limit of a Function
Calculating Limits Using the Limit Laws
5 §2.4
§2.5
The Precise Definition of a Limit
Continuity
6 §2.6
§2.7
Limits at Infinity; Horizontal Asymptotes
The Derivatives and Rates of Change
7 §2.8
§3.1
The Derivative as a Function
Derivatives of Polynomials and Exponential Functions
8 §3.2
§3.3
The Product and Quotient Rules
Derivatives of Trigonometric Functions
9 §3.4
§3.5
The Chain Rule
Implicit Differentiation

10 §3.6
§3.8
Derivatives of Logarithmic Functions
Exponential Growth and Decay
11 §3.9
§4.1
Related Rates
Maximum and Minimum Values
12 §4.2
§4.3
The Mean Value Theorem
How Derivatives Affect the Shape of a Graph
13 §4.4
§4.5
Indeterminate Forms and L’Hospital’s Rule
Summary of Curve Sketching
14 No Class - Thanksgiving Recess
Week of: Sunday, November 23 - Saturday, November 29, 2008
15 §4.7
 
Optimization Problems
Final Exam Review
(12/11) Final Exam - 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

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Homework Assignments

Section

WebAssign Problems

Extra Problems

Homework Due Date

§1.1

 2, 24, 42, 56, 66

SC-p.20 # 1, 10, 22, 23, 28, 36, 43, 57, 65

9/2

§1.2

 2,10, 14, 18, 22

SC-p.34 # 8, 13, 16, 21

9/4

§1.3

 30, 34, 38, 50, 54

SC-p.43 # 3, 28, 33, 42, 53

9/9

§1.5

 14, 16, 18, 20, 26

SC-p.58 # 15, 19, 25

9/11

§1.6

 22, 34, 48, 60, 66

SC-p.70 # 1, 6, 18, 21, 29, 31, 32, 33, 35, 38, 49, 59, 67

9/16

§2.1

 2, 4, 5, 6, 8

SC-p.87 # 1, 7

9/18

§2.2

 4, 8, 32, 34, 40

SC-p.96 # 6, 7, 9, 13, 25, 27

9/23

§2.3

 2, 14, 18, 26, 48

SC-p.106 # 1, 11, 15, 17, 19, 23, 25, 46

9/25

§2.4

 2, 4, 8, 12, 14

SC-p.117 # 1, 3, 13

9/30

§2.5

 4, 32, 38, 40, 42

SC-p.129 # 3, 10, 16, 17, 35, 37, 47

10/2

§2.6

 4, 20, 26, 32, 42

SC-p.140 # 3, 15, 19, 21, 28, 29, 41

10/7

§2.7

 6, 14, 26, 38, 42

SC-p.150 #3, 9, 12, 13, 27, 29, 37, 43

10/9

§2.8

 2, 24, 28, 38, 42

SC-p.162 # 3, 21, 35, 50

10/14

§3.1

 6, 12, 24, 38, 50

SC-p.180 # 4, 7, 10, 14, 15, 20, 22, 25, 29, 37, 49, 74, 77

10/16

§3.2

 10, 22, 28, 32, 44

SC-p.187 # 4, 5, 8, 15, 17, 27, 41, 47

10/21

§3.3

 2, 12, 22, 36, 42

SC-p.195 # 1, 5, 9, 25, 29, 39, 41, 45

10/23

§3.4

 10, 26, 32, 54, 76

SC-p.203 # 3, 9, 11, 15, 17, 19, 25, 31, 41, 51, 65

10/28

§3.5

 8, 12, 26, 46, 52

SC-p.213 # 1, 5, 9, 11, 15, 21, 33, 45, 47, 53, 65

10/30

§3.6

 4, 14, 24, 34, 46

SC-p.220 # 5, 7, 9, 11, 19, 21, 23, 31, 33, 37, 38

11/4

§3.8

 4, 6, 8, 16, 18

SC-p.239 # 3, 5, 9, 13

11/6

§3.9

 6, 12, 14, 20, 28

SC-p.245 # 7, 13, 15, 21, 23

11/11

§4.1

 30, 44, 48, 54, 60

SC-p.277 # 3, 5, 7, 31, 47, 51, 53, 57

11/13

§4.2

 2, 4, 8, 12, 24

SC-p.285 # 1, 3, 7, 11, 25

11/18

§4.3

 2, 10, 32, 36, 46

SC-p.295 # 1, 5, 7, 9, 11, 19, 31, 35, 45, 61

11/20

§4.4

 10, 12, 26, 40, 60

SC-p.304 # 5, 9, 11, 15, 17, 19, 25, 29, 43, 55, 59, 71

12/2

§4.5

 2, 12, 26, 40, 60

SC-p.314 # 3, 5, 9, 11, 27, 41, 57

12/2

§4.7

 2, 4, 12, 28, 40

SC-p.328 # 3, 5, 10, 18, 32, 47, 53, 55, 69

12/5


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Course Instructors


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Student Information


Calculator Policy
Students should bring a graphing calculator (most models will do) to all classes and know how to operate it properly. Calculators will be allowed during exams; however, all work must be shown in order to receive full credit on a problem.

Academic Integrity
A fundamental tenet of all educational institutions is academic honesty; academic work depends upon respect for and acknowledgement of the research and ideas of others. Misrepresenting someone else's work as one's own is a serious offense in any academic setting and it will not be condoned.
Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to, providing or receiving assistance in a manner not authorized by the instructor in the creation of work to be submitted for academic evaluation (e.g. papers, projects, and examinations); any attempt to influence improperly (e.g. bribery, threats)any member of the faculty, staff, or administration of the University in any matter pertaining to academics or research; presenting, as one's own,the ideas or words of another for academic evaluation; doing unauthorized academic work for which another person will receive credit or be evaluated; and presenting the same or substantially the same papers or projects in two or more courses without the explicit permission of the instructors involved.
A student who knowingly assists another student in committing an act of academic misconduct shall be equally accountable for the violation, and shall be subject to the sanctions and other remedies described in The Student Code.

Support Services

The Dean of Students Office provides student support services in a number of areas. The following websites and phone numbers can be used to access these services:

Every effort will be made to accommodate students with documented learning disabilities. For information on how to access university provided services, please see the following sites:

Tutoring
It may be that at some point during this semester you may need extra help in order to understand the material taught in class. There are a number of places you can go to receive extra help. First, you should visit your instructor or TA during his or her office hours. If you need further help you can visit--the Q-Center.

Q-Center
The Q-Center (Q for Quantitative) operates in conjunction with various departments on campus (e.g., biology, chemistry, economics, mathematics, physics, statistics, and the School of Business) and provides the following resources to help students succeed in their Q-courses:

  • Tutoring- on a drop in basis
  • Assistance with homework
  • Exam review sessions (including a bank of previous exams)
  • Forming and assisting study groups from within your Q-classes

Students visiting the Q-Center should bring their textbooks, class notes, and calculators. The Q-Center is located on the first floor of the Homer Babbage Library. See the Q-Center website for details on available hours. The staff is made up of well-trained graduate and undergraduate students who provide a welcoming environment and are interested in helping students achieve in their courses. You can find out more about this center by visiting the following website: http://www.qcenter.uconn.edu/

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Grading

Homework-WebAssign

Throughout Semester

15%

Exam I

10/16

25%

Exam II

11/13

25%

Final Exam

12/11

35%

Gateway Exam

 

Pass / Fail


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Exams and Homework

No make-ups on homework or exams will be granted unless of an emergency. In such cases you need to notify your TA and provide him or her with a note detailing the emergency in order to receive permission to take the missed quiz or exam.

Gateway Exam
The Gateway exam is an online exam that is given in MSB 203 (Mac Lab). There will be an open period from September 22 through October 31 during which the Gateway exam may be taken. The exam will be graded without partial credit and a 70% score is required to pass the exam. The score on the Gateway exam will not count toward your final grade; however, failure to pass the exam will lower the course grade by one full letter grade. Practice versions of the exam are available online. You may take the exam as often as you need during the open period and the times at which you may take the exam are posted in MSB 203.


Exam I

Exam I will be given October 16th from 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm. The room in which the exam will be given is specified in the table below. This exam will cover the material in Chapters 1 and 2 and will count toward 25% of your final grade.

Discussion Section Room for Exam I
11D, 12D, 19D, 54D, 58D 74D, 75D, 77D SCHN 55
13D, 16D, 17D, 18D, 57D, 71D, 72D, 76D, 80D TLS 154

31D, 33D, 51D, 53D, 59D, 60D

CHEM A120
32D, 34D, 35D, 39D, 40D, 73D PB 36

 


Exam II

Exam II will be given on November 13th from 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm. This exam will cover sections 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6. 3.8. and 3.9 and will count toward 25% of your final grade. The room in which the exam will be given is specified in the table below.

Discussion Section Room for Exam II
11D, 12D, 19D, 54D, 58D 74D, 75D, 77D SCHN 55
13D, 16D, 17D, 18D, 57D, 71D, 72D, 76D, 80D TLS 154

31D, 33D, 51D, 53D, 59D, 60D

CHEM A120
32D, 34D, 35D, 39D, 40D, 73D PB 36




Final Exam

The Final Exam is scheduled on 12/11 from 10:30am-12:30pm. This exam will cover all the material discussed throughout the semester and will count toward 35% of your final grade.


Discussion Section Time Room for Exam II
10-20D TH 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM PB 36
30-40D TH 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM SCHN 55

50-60D

TH 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM CHM A120
70-80D TH 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM TLS 154



Homework

Assigned homeworks are to be completed online using Enhanced WebAssign. Homework must be completed on the scheduled date (see Homework Assignments above). The lowest two homework grades, including missed homeworks, will be dropped. Homework will count toward 15% of your final grade.


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Final Exam Schedule

The final exam schedule will be posted later in the fall when it becomes available from the Office of the Registrar.

 

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